Thursday, November 10, 2011

The Bermuda Love Triangle

If your novel doesn’t include a love triangle are you missing the boat – or worse – lost in no man’s land never to be heard from again?

Two guys vying for the protagonist. It’s every lady’s dream, right?

Not this writer’s. My dream, since I started noticing boys in the first grade, has been for a boy to love me. I’m drawn to teamwork between two characters. The elusive soul mate. The one and only.

If a young woman has to choose between two guys (and is having difficulty doing so), there’s no overwhelming sense of connection that leaves no doubt in her mind.

I like crazy connected love. Romeo and Juliet style. Can’t live without you.

I just finished reading two fantastic books that sucked me into an alternate reality: Divergent by Veronica Roth and Delirium by Lauren Oliver.

Despite their dark themes they went with romance of the two person, team-up variety. The kind of romance that pitted the couples against dangerous obstacles and made the reader fear all hope was lost. But at least they had love. True love. Sigh.

Love triangles: Love ’em? Hate ’em? Don’t care either way?

4 comments:

  1. Snooze. Love triangles bore me. To. Death.

    Actually, I'm not really into romance in books at all. Romantic subplots are okay, I guess, but not main plots.

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  2. I'm the same. Love triangles don't do anything for me. I don't mind them occasionally, but I prefer the conflict not to be about another guy, unless he's the antagonist.

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  3. Interesting concept. The Love Triangle really upsets me when the MC ends up with the wrong guy, at least in my opinion.

    Definitely, more the one true love kind of person. Let the happy couple fight the foes.

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  4. I think that love triangles have a place in stories. After all, they do sometimes happen in real teen (and even adult) lives, so if we're being realistic they'll sometimes happen in YA fiction.

    But the key word is "sometimes". I think some authors use the love triangle to manufacture conflict, and that's led to there being too much fiction with the love triangle as a prominent feature.

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